Journalists upset over new law

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Journalists upset over new law

Laney Hoggatt, Co Editor-in-Chief

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Recently, Arkansas lawmakers in a 25 to 14 vote to change the state’s standards for education. This change only requires schools to provide English, math, science and social studies. It does not specify other courses like drama, band, foreign languages or journalism as well as previously required core classes such as physics and world history.

Journalists felt it was an attack against journalism; however, the law addresses multiple previously required to offer courses; it states that only certain courses are required. Many lawmakers who were interviewed after the vote stated that they have nothing but respect for journalism, as well as other programs but some schools cannot afford to provide students with a plethora of classes.

In a quote from Knoe News, “Journalism is very important in a well-rounded education,” Senator Bart Hester said. “It’s certainly not a step in the direction some would like to see but it’s a step in giving local control back, letting people manage their budgets the best they can.”

Before this, schools were required to offer a journalism course to students at least once every two years.  Many small schools had started to offer the courses to students online to meet this accreditation requirement.  Larger schools do not expect to see any changes to their journalism programs.  Jessica Vest, adviser to The Register said, “Schools like Fayetteville High School are not going to get rid of their newspaper or yearbook programs.  Journalism is here to stay.”

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