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Journalists upset over new law

Laney Hoggatt, Co Editor-in-Chief

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Recently, Arkansas lawmakers in a 25 to 14 vote to change the state’s standards for education. This change only requires schools to provide English, math, science and social studies. It does not specify other courses like drama, band, foreign languages or journalism as well as previously required core classes such as physics and world history.

Journalists felt it was an attack against journalism; however, the law addresses multiple previously required to offer courses; it states that only certain courses are required. Many lawmakers who were interviewed after the vote stated that they have nothing but respect for journalism, as well as other programs but some schools cannot afford to provide students with a plethora of classes.

In a quote from Knoe News, “Journalism is very important in a well-rounded education,” Senator Bart Hester said. “It’s certainly not a step in the direction some would like to see but it’s a step in giving local control back, letting people manage their budgets the best they can.”

Before this, schools were required to offer a journalism course to students at least once every two years.  Many small schools had started to offer the courses to students online to meet this accreditation requirement.  Larger schools do not expect to see any changes to their journalism programs.  Jessica Vest, adviser to The Register said, “Schools like Fayetteville High School are not going to get rid of their newspaper or yearbook programs.  Journalism is here to stay.”

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About the Writer
Laney Hoggatt, Co Editor-in-Chief

I am a senior. This is my third year reporting and second year being an editor. I typically write features articles. I am the choir president and am in A Capella choir and Encore choir. In my free time, I enjoy writing, singing, and binge-watching t.v shows and movies. I spend most of my time with my friends and family. I love dogs and will definitely ask to see pictures.

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2 Comments

2 Responses to “Journalists upset over new law”

  1. Bernard Sulliban on September 30th, 2018 12:23 pm

    They are not (primarily) trying to ‘undo’ journalism as a course offering, specifically.
    What legislators in LR are trying to do is to make it easier for CHARTER schools to make claims that they offer as much as the (new) law demands.
    That way, they are not compelled to offer as many “CORE” courses, so the charter school can offer whatever class it wants to.
    *Charter schools do NOT even have to provide a CERTIFIED Teacher for instruction.

  2. Jessica Vest on October 1st, 2018 9:11 am

    Exactly! No one is “targeting” journalism despite how it’s being covered. Thanks for your comment!

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




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Journalists upset over new law