Register

Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets

UofA+students+take+the+streets+right+outside+Washington+County+courtroom
UofA students take the streets right outside Washington County courtroom

UofA students take the streets right outside Washington County courtroom

KFSM-5 news

KFSM-5 news

UofA students take the streets right outside Washington County courtroom

Trinity Davis, Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Saturday, Jan. 27, a student-led People’s march on Fayetteville right outside NWA’s very own Washington County courtroom. According to KFSM, University of Arkansas students Avery Phillips and Emma Nilsson said, “that after one year of Donald Trump’s presidency, they knew they wanted to do something.”

Approximately 100 people joined the students to march in support of all marginalized people in America. Event attendees told KFSM that they march for numerous reasons, from protesting the DACA bill to better government leadership.

Like many Americans, Nilsson,”… felt really helpless, we felt really powerless whenever something new would come out or he would say another derogatory thing about a group of people. We just finally wanted to do something.” These students express their feelings about staying informed and not being afraid of inquiry.

According to rallylist.com, the march on Fayetteville is meant to support rights for women, refugees and immigrants, the disenfranchised, DACA dreamers, and the free press; Anyone who is seen as the minority and wants to do something about is “…marching for all people. This is not about Democrats and Republicans. These are bipartisan issues.”

Fayetteville is not the only city that participated in the People’s March. Washington D.C., Detroit, and Cleveland are other areas that have hosted either the People’s March or other sister marches.

Since Donald Trump was sworn into office, many marches have risen from being local protests to being national assemblies. The marches started because many Americans felt that Donald Trump and his plans were a violation of the constitution. Taking advantage of the First Amendment, Americans all over the country host the People’s Marches, impeachment marches, women’s marches, and other demonstrations. Marches all over the country have rallied to protest dehumanization and the lack of government support for the community.

Starting with Detroit Michigan, according to Detroit Free Press,  Adriene Avripas, leader of Metro-Detroit Political Action Network (MDPAN), has organized the impeachment march and sister marches in Detroit. Metro Detroiters have joined the organization to protest President Donald Trump and more specifically exhort Congress about impeachment proceedings. Metro-Detroiters understand they are “aiming to bring awareness and give people hope that there are other people out there who are angry, and that we’re not going to give up hope, and that we’re going to fight this fascist regime”, said Avripas.

Taking it to Strongsville, Lynn Gavigan, just a citizen of Ohio, “believes it is worth the trying to impeach Trump”. Gavigan and several hundred others are joining the cause in protesting against President Trump. Suzy Scullin, a march organizer of Lakewood, said, “… this march is about impeaching a president who has a disdain for the fundamental document of our country — the Constitution.”

According to Cleveland.com, marchers who participated with Gavigan express their feelings toward President Trump and explain why the marching is so important; “Marchers that have participated Scullin explained that why their marching is so important, because having “A leader who doesn’t respect the law puts all Americans — both Republicans and Democrats — in danger and degrades our core principles and values.” They believe that marching is the most effective way to show people that President Trump is the wrong choice and things need to be corrected.

People are aware that change starts in the comfort of the community in which they live. The People’s marches, impeachment marches, and other sister marches are meant not only to signify inequalities in the world but also issues that are overlooked and put off.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

About the Writer
Trinity Davis, Writer

I am a Junior.

I am involved in PDS, Volleyball, NAACP youth council, St. James youth board, NWA Dream Keepers, and Dance.

I am The Register’s Social Media expert in charge, a reporter, and photographer.

My Role Model Is Chance The Rapper and my mom.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets

    Features

    Talk of new schedule

  • Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets

    Features

    Service dog etiquette

  • Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets

    Features

    Another school year signals college financial aid opportunities

  • Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets

    Arts & Entertainment

    Ranking the MCU Films

  • Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets

    Features

    Making a change one kick at a time

  • Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets

    Features

    How to register to vote

  • Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets

    Features

    ASMR is all the rage around the World

  • Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets

    Features

    Third time is the charm

  • Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets

    Features

    Food Waste

  • Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets

    Features

    School board prepares to welcome new member

The Student News Site of Fayetteville High School
Arkansas, Michigan, Ohio, take it to the streets