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Analysis: Women’s March 2k18

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A child represents her passion and shows that age does not matter when it comes to making a difference.

A child represents her passion and shows that age does not matter when it comes to making a difference.

Blue Brasher

Blue Brasher

A child represents her passion and shows that age does not matter when it comes to making a difference.

Blue Brasher, Reporter

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This January 20, 2018, the citizens of Fayetteville united to support the rights of women all across the world. At the second annual Women’s March, people all across the world came together to initiate change. Here, in the town of Fayetteville, thousands of people marched tall and proud with powerful posters and chants. Whether attendees were there for women’s rights, immigration, birth rights, or commentary on the president, a powerful unity took the lead.

The first planned protest was in Washington, D.C. in 2017, and is known as the Women’s March On Washington. According to organizers it was meant to “send a bold message to our new administration on their first day in office, and to the world that women’s rights are human rights” The Washington March drew 440,000 to 500,000 people. Between 3,267,134 and 5,246,670 people participated in the Women’s March in the United States. In total, worldwide participation has been estimated at over five million.

In Washington D.C. alone, the march was the largest single political demonstration since the anti-Vietnam war protests in the 1960s and 1970s. The Women’s March crowds were peaceful, and no arrests were made in D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City, and Seattle, where an estimated combined total of two million people marched.

This annual tradition has continued as people refuse to step down from their beliefs and rights. In this excruciatingly divided economic climate, The Women’s March gives hope for a united future full of perseverance and strength.

Protesters gather at the Town's Center to listen to various speakers from around the community speak about the change they want to see in America.
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About the Contributor
Blue Brasher, Reporter
My name is Blue Brasher and I am a sophomore at Fayetteville High School. I love writing and I am very passionate about activism. I also enjoy dancing, singing, embroidering, and writing music. This is my first year on the FHS Register and I am excited to get better at writing and learn what it’s...
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