Taking the World By Storm

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Taking the World By Storm

By NOAA/NASA [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By NOAA/NASA [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

NASA

By NOAA/NASA [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

NASA

NASA

By NOAA/NASA [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Trinity Davis, Writer

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Two weeks ago Hurricane Harvey hit Houston, Texas and some countries in Central America. Just a couple weeks ago Hurricane Irma hit the Caribbean and made its way to the west coast of Florida.

Sept. 8 – Florida Governor Rick Scott has warned all the people of Florida to evacuate immediately. An estimated 6.3 million people have been ordered to evacuate according to Florida Division of Emergency Management.

Hurricane Irma is predicted to travel up the west coast pushing water east. Hurricane Irma is traveling toward Georgia and the Carolinas.

Sept. 9 and 10-  According to CNN News, Hurricane Irma was announced as a category 4 with wind speeds of 130 miles per hour. West Florida has had 20 to 25 inches of rain in total. The rain forecast for Naples, Orlando and Jacksonville is 10 to 15 inches of rainfall. Atlanta, Miami, Columbia and West Palm Beach is 5 to 7 inches of rain. Hurricane Irma’s eye is traveling to Tampa at a rate of 8 miles per hour.

Sept. 11- In Tampa, Florida, hurricane Irma was downgraded to a category 1 storm and wind speeds weakened to 85 miles per hour and are expected to continue to decrease. Hurricane Irma is now Tropical Storm. It has a wind speed of 70 miles per hour. Tropical Storm Irma’s eye is still located northwest Florida. The storm is estimated to reach the Georgia border around 11 a.m. Florida’s coastline is dry and there is no water in the ocean. Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn said “What we thought was going to be a punch in the face was a glancing blow”, after looking at the overall effects of Hurricane Irma. Although Hurricane Irma did not leave as much as an expected aftermath, the people of Florida are suffering from power outages and it could extend to weeks.

Tropical storm Irma is traveling to north-northwest Georgia with weakened wind speeds. According to the National Hurricane Center, in its latest advisory Irma remains a tropical storm and will likely weaken to become a tropical depression by Tuesday.

Satellite photos show that Hurricane Irma turned some Caribbean islands that were hit the hardest turned brown

Sept. 12- Tropical storm Irma is now tropical depression Irma. Irma’s  path has left Florida in destruction and flooded. Meanwhile, in Georgia, about 930,000 residents left without power.

Sept. 13- Irma weakens again to a post-tropical cyclone. According to the National Hurricane Center’s Eastern update and CBS News said Irma would continue plodding across the southeastern states toward the northwest at about 10 miles per hour. At 5 a.m., Irma was located at the center about 65 miles southwest of Atlanta, Georgia. As of 7:30 a.m., Florida Keys residents are allowed back into their homes.

According to the CBS News live updates, many evacuees are worried about their future and their other family members. Many people from neighboring states to Florida have gone to shelters to bring extra clothes, food, blankets, and cots. Many of the evacuees are still keeping open minds and wide spirits for others that might have had a harder time.

 

 

 

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